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Usha Marhé

Usha Marhé tijdens 'Tradities, taboes en (bij)geloof' in Theater aan het Spui/Filmhuis Den Haag op zaterdagavond 19 januari in Winternachten 2008.  - foto Serge Ligtenberg
Usha Marhé tijdens 'Tradities, taboes en (bij)geloof' in Theater aan het Spui/Filmhuis Den Haag op zaterdagavond 19 januari in Winternachten 2008.  - foto Serge Ligtenberg

(1964, Surinam) is an author, journalist and teacher. In 2007 Marhé's fiction debut appeared: Dulari-De Weg van Mijn Naam, consisting of six stories with changing perspectives. In the same year her first short story Dilemmas was published in the anthology Waarover We Niet Moeten Praten. With her first non-fiction book Tapu Sjén/Bedek Je Schande - Surinamers en Incest (1996) she broke a taboo by talking about her own experiences with incest. The book was well-received by critics and considered courageous. In Surinam the topic can now be discussed owing to the book. As a journalist Marhé wrote articles and columns for among others Opzij, de Groene Amsterdammer and Vrij Nederland. In addition she has been giving talks and presentations since 1994 on different social subjects. Marhé has lived in the Netherlands since 1990.

(WIN 2008)

Archive available for: Usha Marhé

  • Winternachten 2008 – Winternachten zaterdagavond

    Traditions, taboos, belief and superstition. Writers from the Antilles and Surinam

    A man dies. His lover puts a set of used underpants of her in his coffin. That's the custom in Surinam. But how do you do it without arousing the suspicion of his wife? And is this the only pair of underpants? Budding talent Ruth San A Jong wrote stories from Paramaribo like the one about the underpants above. Grande dame Sonia Garmers from Curaçao and Usha Marhé, who lives in the Netherlands, have written about rituals, magic and traditions which are part of daily life in their country. Belief and superstition can defuse fear but also arouse it: what if you don't keep to the accompanying customs? What if you want to break though tradition. The writers, varying in age, discuss this and other questions and read from their work. Noraly Beyer leads the conversation. In Dutch.