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Elisabeth Sturtewagen

Elisabeth Sturtewagen
Elisabeth Sturtewagen

(Belgium) took cello lessons at the Lemmens Institute in Leuven as of age 15. She earned her Bachelor degree at the Royal Conservatory Antwerp and her Master at the Royal Conservatory Brussels. She has taken master classes in the Netherlands, Poland, France, Spain, Belgium and Belarus. In the summer of 2012 she met the world-famous cello teacher Vladimir Perlin, with whom she is still studying. Since 2014, she has been a cellist with the chamber orchestra Young Belgian Strings, directed by Dirk Van de Moortel, and is also a member of the Etereo Ensemble. She is co-founder and cellist with the cello quartet BRUXELLO, with which she performs at home and abroad. She also regularly performs with the visual Artist Koenraad Tinel. Sturtewagen plays an instrument built in Brussels in 1911 by Hilaire Darche.

Archive available for: Elisabeth Sturtewagen

  • Winternachten 2018 – Friday Night Unlimited

    Ode to Joy

    Schiller's idealistic poem about Europe and humanity, adapted to the here and now! Writers Unlimited asked seven writers and poets each to write their own Ode to Joy. Tonight they present the results.

    You can look forward to odes by Nino Haratischwili, Magda Cârneci, Sanam Sheriff, Efe Murad, Grazyna Plebanek, Gustaaf Peek. Ghayath Almadhoun and Charlotte Van den Broeck. They will recite their work in their mother tongues, with simultaneous projections of Dutch and/or English translations. Classical accordionist Oleg Lysenko, Cellist Elisabeth Sturtewagen and soprano Jole De Baerdemaeker provide musical accompaniment.

    Originally written in 1785, Schiller's Ode to Joy lives on because Ludwig van Beethoven added one of its stanzas to the finale (for choir and soloists) of his Ninth Symphony. In 1985, the European Union Chose this particular segment - albeit in wordless form - as the official hymn of the EU. In the poem, Schiller transmits the ideal of a world in which all people live in brotherhood.

  • Winternachten 2018 – Friday Night Unlimited

    Fraternité! The Forgotten Value of Brotherhood

    The longing for a strong collective feeling has once again become a source of social movements around the world. That "we"-feeling feeds passionate new emancipation and indentity groups. It also causes social fragmentation and conflict.

    Brotherhood, the third pillar of democracy from the French Revolution, has long been viewed as a less inflammatory societal value compared with Freedom and Equality. But the comeback of a strong collective feeling is connected to high levels of polarization and conflict in society.

    Bas Heijne, winner of the P.C. Hooft Prize for his essays and a prominent NRC newspaper columnist, investigates why the power of a longing for Brotherhood is underestimated, with the help of Flemish cultural historian and writer David Van Reybrouck, Turkish poet and philosopher Efe Murad, German novelist Fatma Aydemir and Polish novelist and journalist Grazyna Plebanek. Together they look for the contemporary words to express a sense of collective bonding.

    The conversations will be accompanied by performances of poetry slam-talent Sanam Sheriff (India), by live drawn illustrations by Gerda Dendooven (Belgium) and by music performed by classical accordionist Oleg Lysenko (Netherlands) and soprano Elisabeth Sturtewagen (Belgium).

  • Winternachten 2018 – Friday Night Unlimited

    Liberté! The Revolutionary meaning of Freedom

    The Congolese novelist and essayist Alain Mabanckou opens Friday Night Unlimited with a lecture about the values of the French Revolution and their meaning in our time.

    Afterwards, writer and essayist Stephan Sanders has conversations with Alain Mabanckou, with historian and political philosopher Luuk van Middelaar and writer Louise O. Fresco about the contemporary meaning of freedom as a driving force of European democracy.

    What is the meaning of the French Revolution's motto in today's Europe? For the revolutionaries, freedom stood for much more than individual aims. it stood for the collective longing for self-determination and for the democratic consideration and manifestation of change and progress. Is anything left of the revolutionary meaning of freedom in contemporary Europe?

    Alternating with the conversations there will be live drawing by visual artist en book illustrator Gerda Dendooven (Belgium) and music by classical accordionist Oleg Lysenko (Netherlands), cello player Jole De Baerdemaeker and soprano Elisabeth Sturtewagen (both Belgium).